May 17, 2020

Walmart: New supply chain academy welcomes its first class

Retail
Georgia Wilson
2 min
inside Walmart distribution center
Walmart Inc. distribution center in Sanger, Texas celebrates its first official class at the Walmart Supply Chain Academy.

The new academy is the late...

Walmart Inc. distribution center in Sanger, Texas celebrates its first official class at the Walmart Supply Chain Academy.

The new academy is the latest addition to its list of 200 academies for employees and has been specifically designed to train Walmart’s supply chain associates in the US to provide employees with a clear advancement path.

“Within the Walmart Supply Chain, we are focused on creating a great place to work where our more than 100,000 associates can be empowered to solve problems for our business,” commented Greg Smith, EVP of Walmart U.S. Supply Chain. “This first Supply Chain Academy is a pivotal step on that journey. North-central Texas customers will see the impact of the training and hard work of these graduates on the shelves of the more than 140 Walmart stores and Sam’s Clubs this distribution center serves.”

Areas of study at the academy will included leadership, safety, supply chain foundations and area specific training to Walmart employees in order for them to succeed in current roles as well as grow their career. “This is yet another example of Walmart’s commitment to investing in our people so that they can live better and grow in a field that is rapidly evolving,” said Steve Miller, Vice President of Supply Chain People.

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Walmart has plans to expand its supply chain program across the US in more distribution centers over the next two years, with each academy serving 15 distribution centers.

 

Founder: Sam Walton

Revenue: US$518bn

President and CEO: Doug McMillon

Headquarters: Bentonville, Arkansas

No. of employees: 496,361 (LinkedIn)

 

Did you know? Sam Walton opened the very first Walmart store on July 2nd 1962 in Rogers, Arkansas

 

For more information on all topics for Procurement, Supply Chain & Logistics - please take a look at the latest edition of Supply Chain Digital magazine.

 

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Jun 22, 2021

ASCM: Supply chain pay gap closes in under 40s

ASCM
Supplychain
GenderEquality
Logistics
2 min
Women under 40 in supply chain now earn more than men, according to ASCM’s 2021 salary and career report, though POC and older women still face imbalance

The pay gap between men and women working in supply chain under the age of 40 has finally reached parity, according to the Association for Supply Chain Management’s latest annual Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

The gender pay gap in this age group had been narrowing over the past two years, the ASCM’s previous surveys show, and in 2021 has closed entirely. Women report a median salary of $81,000 annually, while men earn a median annual salary of $79,000. Across all age brackets, men report a median salary of $82,000 and women $80,000.

Other highlights from the ASCM report

  • 95% of supply chain professionals kept their job through the pandemic
  • The typical starting salary for a supply chain professional is $60,000
  • 48% of supply chain professionals now work from home
  • 88% of survey respondents find supply chain a fulfilling career path

 

But there is still work to be done in closing the divide in those over the age of 40. Older men are still earning far more than their female peers, with a discrepancy of between $12,000 and $23,000 annually. ASCM’s report does not definitively conclude why this disparity remains, but says women who began their careers several decades ago may have started out on lower salaries. They may also have missed out on steady wage increases and career development after taking time away from work to have and raise families. 

It is also likely that the pay gap in over 40s is affected by a lack of women in executive leadership positions. A recent Gartner study found that, while women now represent 41% of the supply chain workforce - a five year high - only 15% of executive level positions are held by women. That figure is a decline of two per cent on 2020. 

ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report
Source: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report


Supply chain’s racial pay gap remains

For the first time, ASCM’s annual survey also looked into the pay gap between ethnicities, finding that the median salary for black professionals was 12% less than their white peers, and Latinos earned on average 14% less. That represents a divide of between $9,000 and &10,000 in real terms. Asian professionals earned a median salary of $80,000, compared with the $83,000 for white professionals. 

Abe Eshkenazi, the ASCM chief executive, said reporting on and acknowledging lingering wage disparity was not enough: “Supply chain organisations must lead the way by creating environment where diverse talent is valued, included and developed. The need for supply chain professionals has never been greater, so now is the time to expand the aperture to include diversity of thought, influence and input — particularly for women and people of colour.”    

Read the full report: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

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