How ballast water from ships is destroying the Great Lakes ecosystem

By Freddie Pierce
Correction: The fine authorities of the Great Lakes recently brought it to our attention that Asian carp were in fact brought to the United States by Ca...
Correction: The fine authorities of the Great Lakes recently brought it to our attention that Asian carp were in fact brought to the United States by Catfish farmers and not from the ballast water found in ships. Come to think of it, how the heck would an Asian carp get in a ship's hold for ballast water anyways? That's just ridiculous! We apologize, and please feel free to contact me (Brett Booen) by phone or email with any concerns about any of the content on Supply Chain Digital. We apologize for the mistake. 





















targeted shipping and logistics



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