May 17, 2020

London Gateway begins apprenticeship scheme

DP World
London Gateway
Port
Engineering
Freddie Pierce
2 min
Potential Apprentices visiting London Gateway
DP World London Gateway has launched a new apprenticeship scheme aimed at raising the profile of job opportunities at the new port development. This w...

 

DP World London Gateway has launched a new apprenticeship scheme aimed at raising the profile of job opportunities at the new port development.

This week the hunt is on to recruit six apprentices to undertake a four-year programme combining study, training, and hands-on work experience in engineering. At the end of the programme, each apprentice will have gained nationally recognised engineering qualifications, setting them up to launch a career in mechanical and electrical engineering.

DP World London Gateway will pay an annual salary for six students to study at college and carry out work experience on-site over a four year period. This will culminate in the award of a Higher National Certificate in engineering.

Simon Moore, CEO, DP World London Gateway, said: “We are now looking for six candidates with a passion for engineering and then we’ll do the rest. The team at DP World London Gateway is committed to delivering highly skilled jobs to the local area and this is a great opportunity for young people to learn and gain valuable experience and qualifications. These opportunities are just some of many already offered, as we have many jobs requiring different skills available now.”

Potential candidates from South Essex College were given a site tour by the London Gateway team in the presence of Simon Metcalfe, local MP and government minister, and Thames Gateway Minister Brandon Lewis.

Thames Gateway Minister Brandon Lewis said: "This fantastic new apprenticeship scheme will create a life changing opportunity for six young people, giving them the building blocks they need to have a highly skilled career in a world class company. Apprenticeships are at the heart of our drive for a stronger economy, and DP World's first class apprenticeship scheme shows what is achievable when Government and the private sector work together to equip future generations with the tools they need to thrive and compete in a global economy."

Stephen Metcalfe MP, South Basildon and East Thurrock, said: “This is great news for South Essex and a great opportunity for local people to take advantage of a global company investing into the area. I’m passionate about helping to drive forward skills in our local area, so I’m very pleased to see DP World investing long term into the youth of the area with this four year programme.”

The selected college provider for the apprentice scheme is South Essex College of Higher Education, with campuses in Thurrock, Basildon and Southend-on-Sea.

People with a passion for engineering are encouraged to find out more by visiting DP World’s Emerging Talent website and to apply by 14th June (search: DP World Emerging Talent).

Share article

Jun 15, 2021

FedEx is Reshaping Last Mile with Autonomous Vehicles

FedEx
Logistics
LastMile
AutonomousVehicles
3 min
FedEx is expanding a trial of autonomous vehicles in its last-mile logistics process with partner Nuro, including multi-stop and appointment deliveries

FedEx is embarking on an expanded test of autonomous, driver-less delivery vehicles to develop its last-mile logistics. 

The US logistics firm piloted autonomous vehicles from Nuro in April this year, and the pair will now explore that further in a multi-year partnership. Cosimo Leipold, Nuro’s head of partnerships, said the collaboration "will enable innovative, industry-first product offerings that will better everyday life and help make communities safer and greener". 

FedEx will explore a variety of on-road use cases for the autonomous fleet, including multi-stop and appointment-based deliveries, going beyond more traditional applications of the technology in single-route movement of goods from A-B. Exponential growth in ecommerce is spurring its broader experimentation in new autonomy solutions, Fed-Ex says, both in-warehouse and on-road. 

“FedEx was built on innovation, and it continues to be an integral part of our culture and business strategy,” said Rebecca Yeung, Vice President, Advanced Technology and Innovation, FedEx Corporation. “We are excited to collaborate with an industry leader like Nuro as we continue to explore the use of autonomous technologies within our operations.”

 

The changing role of couriers 

Unlike structured delivery networks, operating under long-term partnerships and contracts, agility is where couriers deliver true value - and their ability to deftly solve last-mile fulfilment has most acutely been felt during the pandemic. For the billions of people around the world forced to stay at home to protect themselves and their communities from the spreading COVID-19 virus, couriers have been a constant. They may have been the only knock at the door some people experienced for weeks or months at a time. 

But the last-mile has been uprooted by a boom in ecommerce, a shift that has been most apparent in the UK, US, China and Japan, according to the Global Parcel Delivery Market Insight Report 2021 by Apex Insight. These are markets with dominant economies and populations used to running their lives with a tap of a screen or double-click of a mouse. 

“Getting last mile delivery right has long been a challenge for retailers,” says Kees Jacobs, Vice President, Consumer Goods and Retail at Capgemini. “In 2019, 97% of retail organisations felt their last-mile delivery models were not sustainable for full-scale implementation across all locations. Despite increasing demand from customers, companies were struggling to make the last mile profitable and efficient.”

Jacobs says that the pandemic alleviated some of these stresses in the short term. With no other option, consumers were understanding and tolerant, if not entirely happy, with longer delivery times and less transparent tracking. “But, as extremely high delivery demand continues to be normal, customers will expect brands to contract their delivery times,” he adds. 

Last mile's role in ESG

Demand and volume weren’t the only things that have changed during the pandemic - businesses looked closer to home and as a result became more sustainable. Bricks and mortar stores were transformed from mini-showrooms to quasi-fulfilment centres. Online retailers and other businesses sought local solutions to ship more faster. In densely populated London, UK alone, Accenture found that delivery van emissions dropped by 17%, while Chicago, USA and Sydney, Australia saw similar emissions savings. 
 

Share article