May 17, 2020

Consumers demanding supply chain visibility and performance

Amazon
YouGov
Infor
Visibility
Admin
2 min
Amazon has rocked the ecommerce market with reports that it is to establish its own delivery network
According to a global survey, 78% of consumers want to receive updates on the status of their orders when purchasing goods, and they won't hesitate to s...

According to a global survey, 78% of consumers want to receive updates on the status of their orders when purchasing goods, and they won't hesitate to switch brands if supply chain performance fails to meet their expectations. 

The survey, conducted in February by YouGov and sponsored by Infor, a leading provider of industry-specific cloud applications, polled 6,285 consumers, including a nationally representative sample of consumers in France (1,016), Germany (2,105), the UK (2,035) and the United States (1,129).

Seventy-eight percent of consumers surveyed expect to receive updates on the status of their orders. Of that group, nearly half (49%) of consumers said Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) information – and a further 29% said real-time location information – is most important to know, when waiting for a purchase to be delivered at home or to a pickup location.

Further, the survey showed that consumers will switch brands if supply chain performance doesn't keep pace with their expectations.

According to the survey, it can suggest that consumers are more likely to switch brands related to their day-to-day needs, including groceries (59%), household products (53%), fashion/footwear (40%), and health & beauty products (37%).

However, even in product categories such as high-tech (35%), furniture (32%) and automotive (19%), consumers indicated that they would switch brands if supply chain performance faltered.

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Infor had sponsored a similar YouGov survey in 2016.

“In 2016, we asked similar questions and at that time, among millennials (18-34), fashion was rated number one," said Greg Kefer, Vice President of Marketing for the Infor GT Nexus Commerce Network.

“Now, we are seeing categories such as food and beverage and consumer products rank ahead of fashion, with high-tech not far behind. This is an indication that consumer expectations are on the rise across product categories."

“In our business, supply chain visibility is frequently cited as a foundational element of innovation and transformation,

“Companies must be able to 'see' across the vastness of their global supply chains, so they can identify gaps and make improvements.”

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Jun 22, 2021

ASCM: Supply chain pay gap closes in under 40s

ASCM
Supplychain
GenderEquality
Logistics
2 min
Women under 40 in supply chain now earn more than men, according to ASCM’s 2021 salary and career report, though POC and older women still face imbalance

The pay gap between men and women working in supply chain under the age of 40 has finally reached parity, according to the Association for Supply Chain Management’s latest annual Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

The gender pay gap in this age group had been narrowing over the past two years, the ASCM’s previous surveys show, and in 2021 has closed entirely. Women report a median salary of $81,000 annually, while men earn a median annual salary of $79,000. Across all age brackets, men report a median salary of $82,000 and women $80,000.

Other highlights from the ASCM report

  • 95% of supply chain professionals kept their job through the pandemic
  • The typical starting salary for a supply chain professional is $60,000
  • 48% of supply chain professionals now work from home
  • 88% of survey respondents find supply chain a fulfilling career path

 

But there is still work to be done in closing the divide in those over the age of 40. Older men are still earning far more than their female peers, with a discrepancy of between $12,000 and $23,000 annually. ASCM’s report does not definitively conclude why this disparity remains, but says women who began their careers several decades ago may have started out on lower salaries. They may also have missed out on steady wage increases and career development after taking time away from work to have and raise families. 

It is also likely that the pay gap in over 40s is affected by a lack of women in executive leadership positions. A recent Gartner study found that, while women now represent 41% of the supply chain workforce - a five year high - only 15% of executive level positions are held by women. That figure is a decline of two per cent on 2020. 

ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report
Source: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report


Supply chain’s racial pay gap remains

For the first time, ASCM’s annual survey also looked into the pay gap between ethnicities, finding that the median salary for black professionals was 12% less than their white peers, and Latinos earned on average 14% less. That represents a divide of between $9,000 and &10,000 in real terms. Asian professionals earned a median salary of $80,000, compared with the $83,000 for white professionals. 

Abe Eshkenazi, the ASCM chief executive, said reporting on and acknowledging lingering wage disparity was not enough: “Supply chain organisations must lead the way by creating environment where diverse talent is valued, included and developed. The need for supply chain professionals has never been greater, so now is the time to expand the aperture to include diversity of thought, influence and input — particularly for women and people of colour.”    

Read the full report: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

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