Dec 16, 2020

Inside Trinidad and Tobago’s Maritime Services

Manufacturing
Supply Chain
InvesTT
Logistics
Sean Galea-Pace
2 min
Manufacturing Global explores Trinidad and Tobago's maritime services.
Manufacturing Global explores Trinidad and Tobago's maritime services...

Trinidad and Tobago’s robust maritime infrastructure, strategic geographic location, specialised value chain and ecosystem offer the right environment for your commercial maritime operations or leisure marine activities.

There are several key benefits to investing in Trinidad and Tobago. The country’s natural and safe harbour makes it an ideal location for the storage of ships. This could be particularly useful to oil and gas services companies during periods of a business slowdown. The country seeks to expand the lay-up activities in Trinidad and Tobago as per the government legal, institutional and administrative framework.

The calm waters of the Gulf is a prime location for organisations that seek to transship raw materials from South American countries such as Brazil, Venezuela and Guyana to European and Asian markets. The Port Offshore transshipment facility transfers ore and bulk cargo to North America and China. There are a number of ship repair facilities located in Trinidad, including one dry dock facility with a lifting capacity of 23,000 metric tonnes and an overall length of 230 meters.

Offshore Ship Transshipment Port

Trinidad and Tobago is regarded as one of the world’s biggest destinations for ship storage and lay-ups as a result of naturally sheltered and deep harbour, hurricane safety record and developed infrastructure and support mechanisms. There are opportunities in transshipment for companies that are engaged in the commodities industry in South America and are experiencing considerable issues getting ores and other minerals to destination markets.

The set up of a ship to ship transfer operation within the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad and Tobago and Ship Lay-Ups for vessels temporarily idle as a result of a lack of cargo. The opportunities in ship layups include cold lay-up, which is suitable for vessels up to five years out of service and warm lay-up, which is suitable for vessels up to twelve months out of service. This is primarily due to insufficient and ageing port infrastructure and fluctuating river drafts that make it almost impossible to load large vessels in other locations.

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Jun 21, 2021

Elon Musk's Boring Co. planning wider tunnels for freight

BoringCompany
supplychain
freight
elonmusk
2 min
Elon Musk’s tunnelling firm plans underground freight tunnels with shipping containers moved on “battery-powered freight carriers”, according to reports

Elon Musk’s drilling outfit The Boring Company could be shifting its focus towards subterranean freight and logistics solutions, according to reports. 

A Boring Co. pitch deck seen and shared by Bloomberg depicts plans to construct wider tunnels designed to accommodate shipping containers. 

Founded by Tesla CEO Musk in 2016, the company initially stated its mission was to offer safer, faster point-to-point transport for people, particularly in cities plagued by traffic congestion. It also planned longer tunnels to ferry passengers between popular destinations across the US. 

The Boring Co. completed its first commercial project earlier this year in April. The 1.7m tunnel system is designed to move professionals between convention centres in Las Vegas using Tesla EVs. It says the Las Vegas Convention Centre Loop can cut travel time between venues from 45 minutes to just two. 

 

Boring Co.'s new freight tunnels

The Boring Co.'s new tunnel designs would allow freight to be transported on purpose built platforms, labelled as “battery-powered freight carriers”. The document shows that, though the containers could technically fit within its current 12-foot tunnels, wider tunnels would be more efficient. Designs for a new tunnel, 21 feet in diameter, show that they can comfortably accommodate two containers side-by-side, with a one-foot gap between them.

The Boring Co.’s new drilling machine, dubbed Prufrock, can tunnel at a rate of one mile per week, which is six times faster than its previous machine, and is designed to ‘porpoise’ - mimicking the marine animal by ‘diving’ below ground and reemerging once the tunnel is complete. 

Tesla’s supply chain woes 

Tesla is facing its own supply chain and logistic issues. The EV manufacturer has raised the price of its vehicles, with CEO Musk confirming the incremental hike was a result of “major supply chain pressure”. Musk replied to a disgruntled Twitter user, confused as to why prices were rising while features were being removed from the cars, saying the “raw materials especially” were a big issue. 

Elon Musk Tweet

Car manufacturing continues to be one of the industries hit hardest by a global shortage in semiconductor chips. While China’s chip manufacturing levels hit an all-time high in May, and the US is proposing a 25% tax credit for chip manufacturers, demand still outstrips supply. Automakers including Volkswagen and Audi have again said they expect reduced vehicle output in the next quarter due to a lack of semiconductors, with more factory downtime likely
 

Top Image credit: The Boring Company / @boringcompany

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