Aug 10, 2012

Top 10 Supply Chain Organizations

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Follow @ WDMStanJackson By Jamie Robinson...

By Jamie Robinson...

10.) The European Commission’s High Level Forum for a Better Functioning Food Supply Chain

The high level forum’s mandate is to follow the recommendations of high level groups on the competitiveness of the agro-food industry. It will be comprised of  representatives from European companies dealing with food production, processing or distribution, according to the website. The working groups will focus on flagship issues requiring specific expertise. For more information, visit www.ec.europa.eu.

9.) Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals

The CSCMP offers its members educational events, resources and research for their supply chain betterment. The company offers testing and exams, including the SCPro, a three-level, end-to-end supply chain function mastery test. They host workshops nationwide, including the upcoming CSCMP’s Annual Global Conference 2012, which promises the latest research, interactive discussion, exclusive insights, and keynote speakers. Membership ranges from $150 for a web-based membership to $436.50 for a CSCMP/AMME Joint Membership. For more information on the CSCMP, visit www.CSCMP.org.

8.) Institute for Supply Management

According to their website, the Institute for Supply Management is the largest supply management association in the world. Its mission is to lead the supply management profession through its standards of excellence, research, promotional activities, and education. Founded in 1915, the not-for-profit educational association serves supply management professionals in more than 80 countries. Membership costs vary according to state or country and type of membership. Many are in the $200-$300 range. For more information on ISM, visit www.ISM.ws.

7.) The Healthcare Supply Chain Association

The Healthcare Supply Chain Association focuses on advocacy, education, ethics, information, and liaison services for its members. The organization is a great example of what a trade-specific supply chain association can be.  They conduct research and strive to use knowledge to create best practices in the supply chains of their members. The HSCA also hosts an annual Healthcare Supply Chain Expo. For more information, visit www.higpa.site-ym.com.

6.) The Association for Operations Management

Founded in 1957, APICS has been a leader in knowledge for supply chain and operations management professionals. They provide training, internationally recognized certifications, and comprehensive educational resources in production, inventory, materials management, purchasing and logistics according to their website. They also offer a magazine. Memberships range in cost from $75 in yearly dues for academic professionals to $200 in yearly dues for professional membership. For more information, visit www.apics.org.

5.) Distribution Business Management Association

The DBMA supports Supply Chain Leaders in Action, a national conference for supply chain professionals, which was held this year in Scottsdale, Arizona, in May. The conference was a sort of think tank attended by 50 corporations who collectively contribute $1.5 trillion annually to the economy. There is also a DBM journal, available in PDF form through the website. The DBM focuses on connecting businesses and academia to find solutions to pressing issues facing today and tomorrow’s supply chain and logistics executives. For more information, visit www.dcenter.com.

4.) Utility Purchasing Management Group

The UPMG began in 1924 in New York City, NY, at the first conference to share emerging practices and philosophies to improve supply chain management. According to their website, the UPMG implements industry-wide programs focused on the education and personal development of its membership, supporting the policies and guidelines established by the ISM (see above). The UPMG provides a forum focusing on innovations in purchasing and materials management, and hosts a conference each year for industry-recognized experts. Membership is free. For more information, visit www.upmg.org.

3.) The Carbon Disclosure Project

The Carbon Disclosure Project provides a global process for supply chain disclosure. This information is seen by management in more than 50 of the world’s largest organizations. Joining this group means that a supply chain system wants to better understand how suppliers are addressing climate change, and to show a willingness and desire to reduce each company’s greenhouse gas emissions. For more information, visit www.cdproject.net.

2.) The Grocery Manufacturers Association

For those supply chain managers in the grocery sector, the Grocery Manufacturers Association provides a plethora of insightful articles on product safety, health and nutrition, preserving the environment, global commerce, collaborating with retailers and more. The GMA has also launched the first international food additives database. It provides industry model practices and a means of collaboration between members, retailers and service providers. For more information, visit www.gmaonline.org.

1.) Supply Chain Council

This global nonprofit organization seeks to help member organizations make quick, substantial changes to improve their supply chain performance. Organized in 1996 with 69 member companies, the SCC now has close to 1,000 corporate members worldwide and has established international chapters in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, South East Asia, Brazil and Southern Africa. The Supply Chain Council created the Supply Chain Operations Reference model (SCOR), a model which outlines the Council’s consensus view of supply chain management. Membership ranges from Research (Non-Profit) level at $300 to Corporate-Global level at $6,000. For more information on the Supply Chain Council, visit www.supply-chain.org.

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