Aug 30, 2012

Ten Reasons You Should Consider a Career in Logistics

Admin
4 min
There are more and more logistics jobs becoming available
  Philip Rudy, from Diako...

 

Philip Rudy, from DiakonLogistics.com, explains why he loves his career in logistics and why other people should think about becoming a ‘logistician’

Logistics is one of the most important career fields in the world. Without the planning and execution of the distribution of resources, society as we know it would cease to function and food shortages would cause chaos around the world.

Every company uses logistics even though full-time logistics managers may not be employed. The work of a logistician begins with bringing in the supplies and raw materials necessary for a business or organization to operate. Inbound logistics are then used in conjunction with outbound logistics to distribute products or services where they are in demand.

If you are thinking about a career change, the field of logistics has much to offer.

Following are the top 10 reasons to consider a career in logistics:

1. New opportunities are opening in logistics.

As the global economy has expanded, logistics has become increasingly important. Outsourcing has provided new challenges and new opportunities in logistics. Estimates provided by the U.S. Department of Labor show that logistics jobs will increase in number by 25.5 percent from 2010 to 2020. This estimate means that an additional 27,800 jobs will have been created in this timespan.

2. Careers in logistics are paying more than ever.

In 2002, the average salary of logisticians was $53,000. Today, the median annual earnings of logisticians is nearly $74,000. Although the salary distribution for the lowest 10 percent was $43,500 in 2010, the top 10 percent were earning over $108,000 per year. The top market for logisticians in the U.S. is Bellingham, WA, where the average annual salary is $96,740.

3. Jobs are available in logistics for people of all education levels.

Logistics may seem like a complicated job that requires an advanced degree, but this depends on which facet of logistics you enter. Truck drivers, warehouse workers and forklift operators are all part of the logistics team, but they are organized and directed by mid-level managers and experienced logistics executives.

4. Advancement opportunities in logistics are plentiful.

Because logistics has so many facets and levels, opportunities for advancement are always available. In addition, the logistics industry tends to promote and train low-level employees to high-level positions rather than hire from the outside. Promotions are commonplace, and the hardest working and most innovative individuals can advance quickly.

5. Logistics training can be provided by the U.S. government.

Many people who enter the field of logistics do so after serving in the U.S. military. Logistics operations are extremely important in the armed forces, and getting positions in supply chain management is rarely a problem. The practical experience provided by four years of military service is often enough for a mid-level logistics position in a civilian organization.

6. Logistics careers can be started anywhere.

Unlike some careers that require you to relocate to a specific area or region, careers in logistics can begin anywhere. Nearly every company and organization has a need for logistics workers and managers. However, a few locations are known as hotspots of logistics activity, including Los Angeles and Chicago.

7. Logistics careers are rarely boring.

The word boredom is not in the vocabularies of most people with careers in logistics. The sheer variety of work always keeps the job interesting, and crossover may occur when one facet is slow but another is bustling. In addition, many companies specializing in logistics deal with a wide variety of materials and goods.

8. Opportunities for women are expanding in logistics.

Logistics careers have traditionally been held by men, but women are becoming increasingly involved at all levels. Many women hold top positions in logistics companies and logistics departments.

9. Logistics is a stepping stone into the field of international business.

Many people who begin a career in logistics find that they quickly gain enough experience with international business to develop new skills or open new opportunities. Learning a second language is much easier when you are working with people who speak that language. In addition, it may be possible to relocate to other countries temporarily or permanently.

10. People working in logistics develop fraternal relationships.

People who have a career in logistics cite their coworkers as one of its great advantages. Logistics can be a demanding field, and those working in it develop a high level of pride in their jobs.

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Aug 24, 2018

Top 10 air freight carriers

Supply Chain
James Henderson
5 min
Supply Chain |Digital runs down the world's top 10 air freight carriers
10. Cargolux Group

10. Cargolux Group

The Luxembourgish freight carrier Cargolux Group (comprised of Cargolux Airlines and Cargolux Italia, established in 2008) remained in the number 10 spot, with a total reported FTK (Freight Tonne Kilometer) equaling 7.45 bn, which represents a 7.7% expansion year-over-year. The carrier group currently operates a fleet of 30 aircraft (26 through Cargolux Airlines and an addition four through Cargolux Italia), primarily variants of the Boeing 747.

http://www.cargolux.com/

9. Korean Air

Headquartered in Seoul, Korean Air provides cargo and passenger services to over 100 destinations in 44 countries. The carrier fell from eighth place in the previous year’s rankings, with a total FTK of 7.66 bn, representing a 7.1% decrease year-over-year. Korean Air reported a net revenue of $10.7bn in 2017, also reporting a return to profitability for the first time in five years, according to Forbes.

https://www.koreanair.com

https://www.facebook.com/KoreanAir.GB/?brand_redir=40926477823

https://twitter.com/KoreanAir_KE

https://www.instagram.com/koreanairworld/

 8. Air France-KLM

The Air France-KLM freight carrier group was founded in 1947. The group is comprised of Air France, KLM, and Martinair, and is based in Paris, France. Falling from seventh place in the Freight 50 rankings, the carrier reported a total FTK of 8.13 bn, which represents a 9.2% decrease in traffic year-over-year. The group reported a net revenue of $29.08bn at the end of 2017 and is ranked #28 on Forbes Magazine’s list of Best Employers.

https://www.klm.com

https://www.facebook.com/KLM

https://twitter.com/klm

7. Qatar Airways

Qatar Airways, the nationally owned airline of the Kingdom of Qatar is based in Doha, and ascended two places in the Freight 50 rankings, with a total FTK of 9.22 bn, representing a 19.6% increase in comparison to the previous financial year. The carrier’s Cargo division recently launched facilities at its hub in Doha to provide a “Seamless Cool Chain”, comprised of a “2,470 square metres Climate Control Centre situated at the airside… equipped with segregated temperature-controlled sections for storing pharmaceuticals and perishables.” This end-to-end supply chain control is expected to further improve Qatar’s standing as a leader of Middle Eastern air freight.

https://www.qatarairways.com

https://www.facebook.com/qatarairways

https://twitter.com/qatarairways

https://www.linkedin.com/company/10834

https://www.youtube.com/user/qatarairways

https://www.instagram.com/qatarairways/

6. Lufthansa Group

Based in Cologne, Germany, the Lufthansa Group (comprised of Lufthansa, Swiss, Austrian, and Brussels Airlines) fell from the fourth position in the Freight 50, with a combined FTK of 9.46 bn. While this represents a 1.6% increase in traffic, year-over-year, the carrier was forced down the list by drastic growth from other German freight company, DHL. According to Forbes, Lufthansa’s revenue and net profits ($41.5 bn and $2.78 bn, respectively) in 2017 are both the highest reported by the company over a ten-year period.

https://www.lufthansagroup.com/en/company.html

https://twitter.com/LufthansaNews/

5. Cathay Group

The Cathay Group (composed of Cathay Pacific Airlines and Dragonair) is headquartered in Hong Kong and its Cargo division accounts for 21% of the airline’s total revenue. The company’s first dedicated cargo flight between Hong Kong, Frankfurt, and London, was established in 1981, according to the official site. Now, Cathay Pacific’s Cargo Division services over 47 destinations worldwide. The carrier fell from the fourth position on the Freight 50 ranking, as its total FTK fell by 3.6%, to 10.21 bn. According to Forbes, Cathay Pacific experienced a second year of unprofitability, although the airline’s asset portfolio reached a record high in 2017, with a net value of $24.1bn.

http://cathay.com.tr/

https://twitter.com/cathaygrouptr

https://www.facebook.com/cathaygrouptr

https://www.linkedin.com/company/2544084/?trk=tyah

4. DHL Express Group

Operating as the largest European carrier group, DHL Express Group (composed of DHL Air, DHL International, Air Hong Kong, Polar Air Cargo, ABX Air, Southern Air, Aerologic, and EAT Leipzig) rose two positions in the Freight 50 rankings. The carrier reported a total FTK of 10.56 bn, which represents an increase of 15.1% year-over-year. In 2018, at the Farnborough Air Show, DHL Express announced the purchase of 14 Boeing 777s, part of a new strategy to modernise its fleet.

http://www.dhl.com/en.html

https://www.facebook.com/dhl

https://www.youtube.com/user/dhl

3. UPS Airlines

Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, UPS Airlines is part of United Parcel Service, Inc. Founded in 1908, UPS is the oldest company in the Top Ten, and retained third place in the Freight 50 rankings, with a total FTK of 11.26 bn. This represents a 3.9% increase year-over-year. The Company as a whole reported a net revenue of $67.7 bn, according to Forbes, representing a continuation of a ten-year trend of continuous growth. Forbes also ranks UPS among the world’s top 100 most-innovative companies, and the world’s top 50 most-valuable brands.

https://www.ups.com/aircargo/

2. Emirates Skycargo

The state-owned air freight carrier for the UAE, Emirates Skycargo remains in second place on the Freight 50, with a total FTK of 12.27 bn, representing a 0.4% decrease year-over-year. The carrier’s central hub in Dubai allows its 259-strong fleet to reach over 1.5 bn consumers in under eight hours. Current purchasing plans are underway for Emirates Skycargo to almost double its fleet size. According to Albawaba, “In response to increasing demand from its customers, Emirates SkyCargo introduced a range of air transport solutions specific to industry verticals including Emirates Pharma, Emirates Wheels and Emirates Fresh.” Emirates Wheels has transported close to 150 cars per month since the program’s inception.

http://www.skycargo.com/english/

1. FedEx Express

Founded in 1998, FedEx Express is both the youngest and largest air freight carrier worldwide, with a total FTK of 15.71 bn. Haulage decreased by 0.9% year-over-year, while revenue increased to $60.5 bn in 2016, and again to $63.8 bn in 2017, continuing an eight-year growth trend. FedEx employs 395,000 members of staff, with FedEx Express operating across twelve transport hubs globally. The carrier purchased an additional 24 Boeing 777 variants in 2018, maintaining their company’s position as the largest airline in terms of cargo haulage.

https://www.fedex.com/fr_english/

https://www.facebook.com/FedExEurope/

https://twitter.com/FedExEurope

https://www.youtube.com/user/fedex/custom

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