Jun 1, 2020

IBM: five principles to build trust and value in blockchain

Blockchain
Sean Galea-Pace
3 min
IBM: five principles to build trust and value in blockchain
In the May edition of Supply Chain Digital, we examined blockchain’s influence on the supply chain and the opportunities that have come to the fore...

In the May edition of Supply Chain Digital, we examined blockchain’s influence on the supply chain and the opportunities that have come to the fore. 

In this article, we examine IBM’s report ‘Blockchain as a force for good: Five principles to build trust and value’, and take a closer look at their blockchain principles that work.

1. Open is better - blockchain networks should harvest diverse communities of open source contributors and organisations. This will allow for open innovation as well as strengthen the overall quality of code. Wherever possible, developers should avoid proprietary technologies in favour of open source frameworks with defined approaches for sharing contributions. If done correctly, this can accelerate innovation, decrease time to maturity and reduce cost.

2. Permissioned doesn’t mean private - blockchains should be designed around the principle of permissioned and trusted access. Permissioned blockchains have an access control layer to allow certain actions to be performed only by certain identifiable participants. Most organisations require the necessity to know exactly what business they’re conducting business with as well as ensuring no illegal activity is being transacted over the network.

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3. Governance is a team sport - enterprise blockchains should embrace distributed and transparent governance to enable networks to serve the requirements of participants and prevent undue concentrations of influence. Enterprises should decide on a platform that automatically provides a democratic structure hardwired into the network, with built-in privacy and ‘permissioning’ features. Rules governing who can join the blockchain network and how should be clearly described, in addition to guidelines on how participants can play key roles. 

4. Common standards are common sense - enterprise blockchains should be centred around common standards with interoperability in mind. This will enable “future-proof” networks, prevent vendor lock-in and encourage a robust ecosystem of innovators. It is important that interoperability includes cloud platforms: vendors should meet participants where their data already is. With most blockchain networks currently sitting in silos, it is deemed acceptable that the technology is evolving to support a network of networks.

5. Privacy is paramount - participants on an enterprise blockchain must be able to control who can access data and under what circumstances. This is vital on a platform that distributes data widely across multiple nodes. Despite no single participant owning a blockchain network, the rights to the data that resides on it should always belong to the creator. Any APIs should extend the same permissioned access programmatically. Blockchain platforms should also abide by privacy regulations, such as General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This means that in most cases, personal data should be kept off-chain.

For more information on procurement, supply chain and logistics topics - please take a look at the latest edition of Supply Chain Digital magazine.

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Jun 18, 2021

New speakers announced for Procurement & Supply Chain Live

Supplychain
Procurement
digitaltransformation
2 min
Two leading executives join the lineup for this September’s inaugural supply chain and procurement live event, Procurement & Supply Chain Live

Two leading executives in supply chain transformation have been confirmed for this year's Procurement & Supply Chain Live event. 

Procurement & Supply Chain Live is the perfect opportunity to hear from prominent executives at the world’s leading procurement and supply chain businesses. The event will be streamed live from Tobacco Dock, London via the leading networking platform Brella.

CLICK HERE to sign up for Procurement & Supply Chain Live today and enjoy special early bird rates

The three-day show, running 28-30 September 2021, is an essential deep dive into the industry, with influential speakers sharing insights and strategies from their organisations, group roundtable discussions, and fireside chats. 

We take a look at the latest additions to the already amazing lineup of speakers announced so far, and what they will bring to the flagship event.


Shaun Plunkett 


VP Global Supply Chain at Macmillan Education Ltd

Shaun Plunkett


Shaun Plunkett has over 30 years of supply chain leadership experience in FMCG, entertainment and media sectors, supporting multi-billion euro businesses including Universal Music, EMI, Sony Music, Harper Collins and Associated British Foods. He has a track record of successfully delivering transformational change coupled with award winning operating models and developing and coaching global teams. Plunkett says that challenging the status quo is at the heart of what drives him on a daily basis - and encouraging others to continuously push the boundaries. 

Read more about Plunkett’s involvement in Macmillan Education’s supply chain transformation HERE


Vikram Singla

Digital Transformation Lead, Oracle UK and Board Member, CILT at Macmillan Education Ltd

Vikram Singla


Vikram Singla is digital transformation director at Oracle, UK. He helps supply chain and finance business leaders leverage technology to deliver meaningful business outcomes for their organisations. He also serves on the board if CILT (Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport) – UK and is an Honorary Visiting Fellow at Anglian Ruskin University. Singla has more than 25 years’ experience in the technology sector, and in global supply chain transformation, including deploying business transformation programmes for Fortune 500 firms. In his spare time, Singla is a passionate brand ambassador for Cancer Research.

 

Plunkett and Singla join a growing line-up of speakers, including: Sheri R. Hinish, IBM; Robert Copeland, G4S; Daniel Weise, BCG; Mark Bromley, Mastercard; David Loseby, Rolls Royce; and Ninian Wilson, Vodafone Procurement Company. 

CLICK HERE to secure your place at Procurement & Supply Chain Live

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