May 17, 2020

Ryder announced as exclusive distributor of Chanje’s electric cargo trucks

Chanje
Ryder
Supply Chain
distribution
Jonathan Dyble
2 min
Truck fleet
Transportation and supply chain operator Ryder has announced a partnership with electric vehicle and energy services company Chanje as the company’s e...

Transportation and supply chain operator Ryder has announced a partnership with electric vehicle and energy services company Chanje as the company’s exclusive sales channel and service provider.

Ryder has placed its first order of Chanje trucks to be distributed to its outlets across the US, with the view of these becoming available for both industrial and commercial lease in the coming weeks.

“We believe electric vehicles will play a major role in the future of commercial transportation and we are proud to partner with Chanje to bring an all-electric medium duty vehicle to market,” said President of Global Fleet Management Solutions for Ryder, Dennis Cooke.

“Through our strategic partnership, Ryder and Chanje will collaborate to promote energy efficiency and innovation in the industry.

“Chanje offers an innovative product that will help reshape the industry by making commercial electric vehicles more affordable, reliable, and accessible.”

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Chanje, based in Los Angeles, is North America’s first firm that offers large scale fleets of electric medium duty trucks, with features of its vehicles including a leading class cargo capacity, able to carry 6,000 pounds, and zero exhaust emissions.

“As we bring commercial electric mobility to American fleets at a meaningful scale for the first time in history, we need the right partner who can provide the breadth and expertise required to accelerate the entry of these vehicles into the market,” said Bryan Hansel, founder & CEO of Chanje, expressing his contentment with the partnership.

“Ryder’s mission to provide flexible fleet management solutions and make commercial transportation more efficient directly aligns with our vision.

“We know Chanje can rely on Ryder to meet the unique service requirements of electric vehicles, as Ryder’s expertise and reach in terms of commercial vehicle solutions is ideal for the rapid adoption of electric trucks.”

The vehicles have been designed with highly populated urban areas in mind, where there is a growing concern over both exhaust and noise emissions of city traffic.

It is reported that replacing just one diesel truck with a Chanje electric vehicle could be as valuable as planting 20 acres of forest in terms of reducing CO2 emissions.

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Jun 22, 2021

ASCM: Supply chain pay gap closes in under 40s

ASCM
Supplychain
GenderEquality
Logistics
2 min
Women under 40 in supply chain now earn more than men, according to ASCM’s 2021 salary and career report, though POC and older women still face imbalance

The pay gap between men and women working in supply chain under the age of 40 has finally reached parity, according to the Association for Supply Chain Management’s latest annual Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

The gender pay gap in this age group had been narrowing over the past two years, the ASCM’s previous surveys show, and in 2021 has closed entirely. Women report a median salary of $81,000 annually, while men earn a median annual salary of $79,000. Across all age brackets, men report a median salary of $82,000 and women $80,000.

Other highlights from the ASCM report

  • 95% of supply chain professionals kept their job through the pandemic
  • The typical starting salary for a supply chain professional is $60,000
  • 48% of supply chain professionals now work from home
  • 88% of survey respondents find supply chain a fulfilling career path

 

But there is still work to be done in closing the divide in those over the age of 40. Older men are still earning far more than their female peers, with a discrepancy of between $12,000 and $23,000 annually. ASCM’s report does not definitively conclude why this disparity remains, but says women who began their careers several decades ago may have started out on lower salaries. They may also have missed out on steady wage increases and career development after taking time away from work to have and raise families. 

It is also likely that the pay gap in over 40s is affected by a lack of women in executive leadership positions. A recent Gartner study found that, while women now represent 41% of the supply chain workforce - a five year high - only 15% of executive level positions are held by women. That figure is a decline of two per cent on 2020. 

ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report
Source: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report


Supply chain’s racial pay gap remains

For the first time, ASCM’s annual survey also looked into the pay gap between ethnicities, finding that the median salary for black professionals was 12% less than their white peers, and Latinos earned on average 14% less. That represents a divide of between $9,000 and &10,000 in real terms. Asian professionals earned a median salary of $80,000, compared with the $83,000 for white professionals. 

Abe Eshkenazi, the ASCM chief executive, said reporting on and acknowledging lingering wage disparity was not enough: “Supply chain organisations must lead the way by creating environment where diverse talent is valued, included and developed. The need for supply chain professionals has never been greater, so now is the time to expand the aperture to include diversity of thought, influence and input — particularly for women and people of colour.”    

Read the full report: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

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