Nov 21, 2019

Nestlé, Walmart and Borealis commit to the New Plastics Economy

Marcus Lawrence
2 min
The initiative, from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, seeks to drive circular plastic economies across myriad industries
The Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF) is committed to promoting circular economy practices with its partners, driving industry towards waste-f...

The Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF) is committed to promoting circular economy practices with its partners, driving industry towards waste-free operations through closed-loop systems.

Its New Plastics Economy (NPE) focuses, as the name would suggest, on enacting this vision for plastics by bringing organisations together to reimagine how plastics are used across industries. In October 2018, EMF launched the New Plastics Economy Commitment which seeks to unite signatories under a shared vision for plastic waste reduction. Of its current signatories, currently amounting to over 400, 20% of all plastic packaging production is already represented within the initiative.

The NPE is bolstered by a roster of industry-leading Core Partners which, prior to 19 November, included Amcor, the Coca-Cola Company, Danone, Mars, Novamont, L’oréal, PepsiCo and Veolia. The world’s largest retailer, Walmart, and its largest food company, Nestlé, join chemical specialist Borealis in bolstering the list, committing to develop and scale a circular economy that is both considerably better for the environment and capable of cutting costs for businesses. As Andy Wood, CEO of Adnams, said in our recent feature: “Waste is a proxy for cost”.

“Collaboration and collective action are critical to achieving system-wide change to the way we think about and engage with plastics. At Nestlé, we don't want any of our packaging, including plastics, to become waste or pollution,” said Véronique Cremades-Mathis, Global Head of Sustainable Packaging at Nestlé, in EMF’s press release

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“The New Plastics Economy initiative represents an important catalyst on the journey to achieving a circular economy for plastics, and we are pleased to be able to contribute to this work through our expanded role as a Core Partner.”

Zach Freeze, Senior Director of Sustainability at Walmart, added: 

“We are excited to join the New Plastics Economy initiative as a Core Partner, which supports our aspirational goal of achieving zero plastic waste.

“Our continued collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation builds upon our work with suppliers to move towards 100% recyclable, reusable, or industrially compostable packaging, use less virgin plastic, and help educate customers on how to recycle more.”

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Jun 22, 2021

ASCM: Supply chain pay gap closes in under 40s

ASCM
Supplychain
GenderEquality
Logistics
2 min
Women under 40 in supply chain now earn more than men, according to ASCM’s 2021 salary and career report, though POC and older women still face imbalance

The pay gap between men and women working in supply chain under the age of 40 has finally reached parity, according to the Association for Supply Chain Management’s latest annual Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

The gender pay gap in this age group had been narrowing over the past two years, the ASCM’s previous surveys show, and in 2021 has closed entirely. Women report a median salary of $81,000 annually, while men earn a median annual salary of $79,000. Across all age brackets, men report a median salary of $82,000 and women $80,000.

Other highlights from the ASCM report

  • 95% of supply chain professionals kept their job through the pandemic
  • The typical starting salary for a supply chain professional is $60,000
  • 48% of supply chain professionals now work from home
  • 88% of survey respondents find supply chain a fulfilling career path

 

But there is still work to be done in closing the divide in those over the age of 40. Older men are still earning far more than their female peers, with a discrepancy of between $12,000 and $23,000 annually. ASCM’s report does not definitively conclude why this disparity remains, but says women who began their careers several decades ago may have started out on lower salaries. They may also have missed out on steady wage increases and career development after taking time away from work to have and raise families. 

It is also likely that the pay gap in over 40s is affected by a lack of women in executive leadership positions. A recent Gartner study found that, while women now represent 41% of the supply chain workforce - a five year high - only 15% of executive level positions are held by women. That figure is a decline of two per cent on 2020. 

ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report
Source: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report


Supply chain’s racial pay gap remains

For the first time, ASCM’s annual survey also looked into the pay gap between ethnicities, finding that the median salary for black professionals was 12% less than their white peers, and Latinos earned on average 14% less. That represents a divide of between $9,000 and &10,000 in real terms. Asian professionals earned a median salary of $80,000, compared with the $83,000 for white professionals. 

Abe Eshkenazi, the ASCM chief executive, said reporting on and acknowledging lingering wage disparity was not enough: “Supply chain organisations must lead the way by creating environment where diverse talent is valued, included and developed. The need for supply chain professionals has never been greater, so now is the time to expand the aperture to include diversity of thought, influence and input — particularly for women and people of colour.”    

Read the full report: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

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