May 17, 2020

Fleets not using telematics to full potential, survey finds

Trucking
telematics
Supply Chain
Supply Chain
James Henderson
2 min
DHL has launched a new tool to help companies mitigate supply chain risk
A survey of more than 2,400 fleet professionals hasfound that while technology adoption is at an all-time high with 77% using telematics for vehicle tra...

A survey of more than 2,400 fleet professionals has found that while technology adoption is at an all-time high with 77% using telematics for vehicle tracking, most fleets are only scratching the surface of technology's potential.

The research conducted by Teletrac Navman deduced that following heavy investment in ELDs last year and technology saturation in the transportation market, fleets must focus on more sophisticated use of telematics features and data for competitive advantage.

Key insights from the survey include:

  • 74% say ELDs remain their top compliance concern in 2018
  • While 64% of fleets are using ELDs to track HOS, 31% are still using paper logs even after the ELD Mandate went into effect
  • 72% perceived benefits from ELDs, with "less risk of compliance violations" at the top (28%), followed by "eliminating manual processes" (20%)
  • Respondents ranked "peace of mind/knowing where vehicles are" as the top benefit from telematics (46%), followed by "more efficient routing and dispatching" (32%)
  • Several important telematics features showed marked decrease in utilisation since 2017, such as monitoring speeding (down 18% since 2017) and harsh braking (down 12%)

“We're seeing more companies invest in telematics, but unfortunately many are only doing so to check the compliance box, not making the most of the technology to better their businesses," said Sid Nair, senior director of transport and compliance, Teletrac Navman.

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“That's likely due to tech fatigue especially in the wake of regulations that demanded new technology, like ELDs, but in the long-term it will be a crippling hindrance, as we're already seeing a widening gap between companies leveraging technology to drive fleet profitability and those who are merely reaping the benefits of the current high demand.

“Training everyone from drivers to fleet executives on how telematics data can boost operations is key, as the data alone won't drive change.”

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Jun 22, 2021

ASCM: Supply chain pay gap closes in under 40s

ASCM
Supplychain
GenderEquality
Logistics
2 min
Women under 40 in supply chain now earn more than men, according to ASCM’s 2021 salary and career report, though POC and older women still face imbalance

The pay gap between men and women working in supply chain under the age of 40 has finally reached parity, according to the Association for Supply Chain Management’s latest annual Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

The gender pay gap in this age group had been narrowing over the past two years, the ASCM’s previous surveys show, and in 2021 has closed entirely. Women report a median salary of $81,000 annually, while men earn a median annual salary of $79,000. Across all age brackets, men report a median salary of $82,000 and women $80,000.

Other highlights from the ASCM report

  • 95% of supply chain professionals kept their job through the pandemic
  • The typical starting salary for a supply chain professional is $60,000
  • 48% of supply chain professionals now work from home
  • 88% of survey respondents find supply chain a fulfilling career path

 

But there is still work to be done in closing the divide in those over the age of 40. Older men are still earning far more than their female peers, with a discrepancy of between $12,000 and $23,000 annually. ASCM’s report does not definitively conclude why this disparity remains, but says women who began their careers several decades ago may have started out on lower salaries. They may also have missed out on steady wage increases and career development after taking time away from work to have and raise families. 

It is also likely that the pay gap in over 40s is affected by a lack of women in executive leadership positions. A recent Gartner study found that, while women now represent 41% of the supply chain workforce - a five year high - only 15% of executive level positions are held by women. That figure is a decline of two per cent on 2020. 

ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report
Source: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report


Supply chain’s racial pay gap remains

For the first time, ASCM’s annual survey also looked into the pay gap between ethnicities, finding that the median salary for black professionals was 12% less than their white peers, and Latinos earned on average 14% less. That represents a divide of between $9,000 and &10,000 in real terms. Asian professionals earned a median salary of $80,000, compared with the $83,000 for white professionals. 

Abe Eshkenazi, the ASCM chief executive, said reporting on and acknowledging lingering wage disparity was not enough: “Supply chain organisations must lead the way by creating environment where diverse talent is valued, included and developed. The need for supply chain professionals has never been greater, so now is the time to expand the aperture to include diversity of thought, influence and input — particularly for women and people of colour.”    

Read the full report: ASCM 2021 Supply Chain Salary and Career Report

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