Oct 22, 2020

Five security trends manufacturers need to be aware of

Lookout
Manufacturing
Supply Chain
Digital Transformation
Sean Galea-Pace
3 min
Array
The manufacturing industry is one of the primary targets for mobile attack...

In fact, 41% of manufacturing companies admitted to suffering a mobile-related compromise with 67% of those saying the impact was major -Verizon Mobile Security Index 2020. 

The reason for that has to do with the way the Manufacturing industry operates. The industry relies on mobile devices and cloud solutions to effectively transition products from the design studio to the shop floor. Providing plenty of opportunities for ill-intentioned hackers to access valuable data.

To better understand the modern threat landscape and the most recent trends facing Manufacturers, download the full whitepaper: How manufacturers can mitigate mobile phishing risks

Five security threat trends manufacturers need to be aware of:

1. Mobile phishing and malware on the rise

Mobile phishing is the primary way malicious actors trick people into downloading malware. Tactics have evolved beyond email phishing to target users via SMS and messaging applications such as WhatsApp or Messenger, even dating apps. An analysis of nearly 200 million devices carried out by Lookout suggests that Manufacturers in Europe are 46% more likely to encounter a phishing attack than their peers in the rest of the world. Learn more.

2. The shift to remote work creates new risks

23% of organizations said cybersecurity incidents have increased since transitioning to remote work, according to the cybersecurity firm (ISC)². More personal devices than ever before are connecting to company networks. And because all of us are using mobile devices for both personal and professional purposes – any attack on a personal device is a threat to the organization’s data. Learn more.

3. Digital safety concerns in a cloud-driven world

Manufacturers have embraced software-as-a-service (SaaS) for productivity and collaboration. The benefits are many however, it has opened sensitive data up to greater cyber risk. Credential abuse is the top attack-vector for SaaS and cloud apps. In fact, a survey by Osterman Research highlights that 40% of organizations say their Microsoft Office 365 account credentials have been compromised. Learn more.

4. Third-party risk

The more, the risker. An expansive supply chain puts manufacturers at greater third-party risk. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 28% of manufacturers admitted to having a security breach involving 3rd party data. Learn more.

5. Protecting Intellectual Property

The manufacturing industry remains one of the primary targets for mobile attack due to highly valuable intellectual property (IP). 87% of manufacturers are concerned about competitors or cybercriminals stealing their trade secrets or intellectual property according to the Verizon Mobile Security Index, 2020. Learn more.

Every smartphone and tablet should be treated as a potential source of threat. Whether it is in the hands of an engineer, a business development executive, or the HVAC service person. Adopting a security solution that adheres to a Zero Trust model, whereby the health of all mobile devices are monitored in real-time, will ensure your organization’s data is secure. Lean how you can mitigate the risk of a data breach from a mobile device at lookout.com

Lookout is offering a 90 day free trial of the leading mobile security application. Get it here.

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Jun 9, 2021

Biden establishes Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force

supplychain
Supplychainriskmanagement
Procurement
Biden
3 min
US government lays out plans for supply chain transformation following results of the supply chain review ordered by President Biden in February

The US government is to establish a new body with the express purpose of addressing imbalances and other supply chain concerns highlighted in a review of the sector, ordered by President Joe Biden shortly after his inauguration. 

The Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force will “focus on areas where a mismatch between supply and demand has been evident,” the White House said. The division will be headed up by the Secretaries of Commerce, Transportation, and Agriculture, and will focus on housing construction, transportation, agriculture and food, and semiconductors - a drastic shortage of which has hit some of the US economy’s biggest industries in consumer technology and vehicle manufacturing. 

“The Task Force will bring the full capacity of the federal government to address near-term supply/demand mismatches. It will convene stakeholders to diagnose problems and surface solutions - large and small, public or private - that could help alleviate bottlenecks and supply constraints,” the White House said. 

In late February, President Biden ordered a 100 day review of the supply chain across the key areas of medicine, raw materials and agriculture, the findings of which were released this week. While the COVID-19 health crisis had a deleterious effect on the nation’s supply chain, the published assessment of findings says the root cause runs much deeper. The review concludes that “decades of underinvestment”, alongside public policy choices that favour quarterly results and short-term solutions, have left the system “fragile”. 

In response, the administration aims to address four key issues head on, strengthening its position in health and medicine, sustainable and alternative energy, critical mineral mining and processing, and computer chips. 

Support domestic production of critical medicines

 

  • A syndicate of public and private entities will jointly work towards manufacturing and onshoring of essential medical suppliers, beginning with a list of 50-100 “critical drugs” defined by the Food and Drug Administration. 
  • The consortium will be led by the Department of Health and Human Services, which will commit an initial $60m towards the development of a “novel platform technologies to increase domestic manufacturing capacity for API”. 
  • The aim is to increase domestic production and reduce the reliance upon global supply chains, particularly with regards to medications in short supply.


Secure an end-to-end domestic supply chain for advanced batteries

 

  • The Department of Energy will publish a ‘National Blueprint for Lithium Batteries’, beginning a 10 year plan to "develop a domestic lithium battery supply chain that combats the climate crisis by creating good-paying clean energy jobs across America”. 
  • The effort will leverage billions in funding “to finance key strategic areas of development and fill deficits in the domestic supply chain capacity”. 


Invest in sustainable domestic and international production and processing of critical minerals

 

  • An interdepartmental group will be established by the Department of Interior to identify sites where critical minerals can be produced and processed within US borders. It will collaborate with businesses, states, tribal nations and stockholders to “expand sustainable, responsible critical minerals production and processing in the United States”. 
  • The group will also identify where regulations may need to be updated to ensure new mining and processing “meets strong standards”.


Partner with industry, allies, and partners to address semiconductor shortages

 

  • The Department of Commerce will increase its partnership with industry to support further investment in R&D and production of semiconductor chips. The White House says its aim will be to “facilitate information flow between semiconductor producers and suppliers and end-users”, improving transparency and data sharing. 
  • Enhanced relationships with foreign allies, including Japan and South Korea will also be strengthened with the express proposed of increasing chip output, promoting further investment in the sector and “to promote fair semiconductor chip allocations”. 
     

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