May 17, 2020

Walmart aims to reduce emissions by 1bn metric tons by 2030

Walmart
US
US
Sean Galea-Pace
1 min
The US-based retail giant, Walmart, has decreased its scope one and two emissions by 6.1% in 2017 in comparison to 2015 as the company gears up to reduc...

The US-based retail giant, Walmart, has decreased its scope one and two emissions by 6.1% in 2017 in comparison to 2015 as the company gears up to reduce its emissions by 1bn metric tons by 2030, according to Supply Chain Dive.

In its first Environmental, Social & Governance Report released on Wednesday (8 May), supplier participation in the company’s Sustainability Index covers 80% of the goods the company sells in stores.

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With Walmart planning to decrease its scope one and two emissions by 18% compared to 2015 levels by 2025 – the firm believes it is on track to make it happen. It is expected that the fleets will become more fuel-efficient and improve its refrigeration systems and powering 50% of its operations with renewable energy by 2025.

The report said: “Walmart has been reporting on a wide range of ESG topics since 2005. In the coming year, we plan to focus on attracting additional suppliers and broadening the scope of initiatives across programmatic areas.”

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Jul 13, 2021

5 minutes with: Ivalua’s Sundar Kamak

Ivalua
supplychain
Manufacturing
Procurement
2 min
Ivalua
Procurement and manufacturing veteran Sundar Kamak, Head of Manufacturing Solutions, Ivalua weighs in on challenges and opportunities in the industry

Who are you? 

My name is Sundar Kamak, I’m Head of Manufacturing Solutions at Ivalua. I’ve been with the company for around two years now, and I’m responsible for our industry solutions and our pre-sales team. Before joining Ivalua I spent almost 20 years in the source-to-pay procurement space, working for a number of providers. But I got my career started in manufacturing and supply chain, specifically in automotive and aerospace.

And what is currently taking up the majority of your professional time?
 

The last year I've been focused in helping organisations put together a digital transformation strategy, especially manufacturing companies, so they can continue to address some of the challenges they face due to the COVID pandemic. 

The traditional approach of engineers designing their latest product then procurement going off to source no longer works


What are the biggest challenges facing your corner of supply chain? 
 

We have a lot of clients coming from different backgrounds - aerospace, high-tech, automotive - and they’re feeling the pressure and the crunch. There’s a lack of product, lack of material availability, lack of resources, labour shortages. So, I work with the leadership in these organisations, try to understand what problems they're looking to solve and come back with Ivalua solutions that can help them address some of these challenges.

Where do the biggest opportunities lie? 
 

If we look at manufacturing, it all comes back to procurement and supply chain being involved sooner in the process. The traditional approach of engineers designing their latest product then procurement going off to source no longer works. It’s important to treat suppliers like partners, which means you build trust, so they can participate very early on in the product design and product development process. It’s not done consistently in the manufacturing sector, but it will be key. 
 

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