May 17, 2020

Microsoft's supply chain feeling effects of coronavirus

Supply Chain
Sean Galea-Pace
2 min
Microsoft has revealed that it is set to miss its revenue target for a key segment in the third quarter due to the coronavirus’ impact on its supply chain.
Microsofthas revealed that it is set to miss its revenue target for a key segment in the third quarter due to the coronavirus’ impact on its supply ch...

Microsoft has revealed that it is set to miss its revenue target for a key segment in the third quarter due to the coronavirus’ impact on its supply chain.

In January, the tech giants confirmed its “More Personal Computing” segment would earn between US$10.7bn and $11.1bn in third quarter revenue. Microsoft revealed that it was a “larger than usual” range that reflects uncertainty related to the deadly virus.

In a press release on 26 February, Microsoft stated: “Although we see strong Windows demand in line with our expectations, the supply chain is returning to normal operations at a slower pace than anticipated at the time of our Q2 earnings call. As a result, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2020, we do not expect to meet our More Personal Computing segment guidance as Windows OEM and Surface are more negatively impacted than previously anticipated.”

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Microsoft is the latest global company to announce the effects of the coronavirus on operations. As reported on Supply Chain Digital in yesterday’s article, other global organisations such as Apple, McDonald’s and Burberry are experiencing significant disruption.

The press release continued: “As the conditions evolve, Microsoft will act to ensure the health and safety of our employees, customers, and partners during this difficult period. We will also continue to partner with local and global health authorities to provide additional assistance. We deeply appreciate the commitment of the people and organisations that have united to address this health emergency; our thoughts are with all those affected across the world.”

Find out how the coronavirus is impacting three other global supply chains here!

For more information on all topics for Procurement, Supply Chain & Logistics - please take a look at the latest edition of Supply Chain Digital magazine.

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Jul 13, 2021

5 minutes with: Ivalua’s Sundar Kamak

Ivalua
supplychain
Manufacturing
Procurement
2 min
Ivalua
Procurement and manufacturing veteran Sundar Kamak, Head of Manufacturing Solutions, Ivalua weighs in on challenges and opportunities in the industry

Who are you? 

My name is Sundar Kamak, I’m Head of Manufacturing Solutions at Ivalua. I’ve been with the company for around two years now, and I’m responsible for our industry solutions and our pre-sales team. Before joining Ivalua I spent almost 20 years in the source-to-pay procurement space, working for a number of providers. But I got my career started in manufacturing and supply chain, specifically in automotive and aerospace.

And what is currently taking up the majority of your professional time?
 

The last year I've been focused in helping organisations put together a digital transformation strategy, especially manufacturing companies, so they can continue to address some of the challenges they face due to the COVID pandemic. 

The traditional approach of engineers designing their latest product then procurement going off to source no longer works


What are the biggest challenges facing your corner of supply chain? 
 

We have a lot of clients coming from different backgrounds - aerospace, high-tech, automotive - and they’re feeling the pressure and the crunch. There’s a lack of product, lack of material availability, lack of resources, labour shortages. So, I work with the leadership in these organisations, try to understand what problems they're looking to solve and come back with Ivalua solutions that can help them address some of these challenges.

Where do the biggest opportunities lie? 
 

If we look at manufacturing, it all comes back to procurement and supply chain being involved sooner in the process. The traditional approach of engineers designing their latest product then procurement going off to source no longer works. It’s important to treat suppliers like partners, which means you build trust, so they can participate very early on in the product design and product development process. It’s not done consistently in the manufacturing sector, but it will be key. 
 

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