May 13, 2021

EY and Harvard Law discuss barriers in Contract Management

supplychain
Procurement
EY
ContractManagement
4 min
EY and Harvard Law School Center discuss Legal Profession survey findings and inefficient contract management procedures among respondent organisations

Contract management is a crucial discussion for procurement professionals as negotiations require a more specific outcome. However, some organisations are experiencing significant barriers to developing their contracting processes. Ernst & Young and Harvard Law School Center have discussed survey results in relation to the current state of contracting and explain where the issues arise.

The Legal Profession survey (part of the 2021 EY Law Survey) highlights the perspectives of 1,000 professionals from across the globe in law, procurement, business development and commercial contracting.

Out of all the major companies surveyed, over half of them say they are experiencing significantly reduced revenue and are missing out on important opportunities due to poorly managed contracting processes. 

Some of the key findings from the survey:

  • 92% of organisations in the survey said they plan to transform their contract handling procedures.
  • 98% of respondents said they face critical barriers in the process of developing contract management.
  • 38% of organisations said they have tried and failed already to implement a better contract management procedure. 
  • 57% said they had experienced less positive revenue due to inefficient contracting systems.
  • 50% of respondents said they had missed profitable business opportunities.

Kate Barton, Global Vice Chair, EY, has expressed her opinion on the survey, “Revenue growth is a fundamental goal for any commercial organisation and effective contracting processes play a crucial role in making that possible. Contracting teams around the world know the value they can bring, and they are making real efforts to transform, but the survey brings into sharp focus a whole range of obstacles that they must navigate if they are to make the improvements they are aiming for.”

What will organisations need to address to develop their contracting methods? 

Cost-Reduction

Many organisations are under pressure to reduce costs, specifically contracting professionals. This is something that nearly all of the survey respondents will be looking to do in the next two years, while a third of larger organisations aim to scale this to a 30% reduction in contracting costs.

Decision-Making Issues

There is a certain lack of clarity among organisations as to who is responsible for contract management. It is unclear to most how the contracting process should be managed; perhaps this could be because it involves an agreement between various stakeholders. Around 59% of legal departments believe they have the leading role, while a similar number of contracting staff also share this view. 39% of business developments professionals believe they are to hold the decision-making power.

Utilisation of Technology

There seems to be a lack of capability among organisations to analyse and manage contracts. According to the survey, around 70% of organisations have a technology strategy in place to manage contracts; the majority still lack the necessary data to utilise it to full capacity. This is likely caused by insufficient knowledge for implementation that is likely a direct result of a skills shortage, which 34% of organisations have reported as an issue that limits them.

Insufficient Contracting Processes 

A lack of a defined contract drafting process will significantly limit how effective the contract will be. Global Legal Managed Services Leader at Ernst & Young, John Knox, explains, “the importance of getting contracting right cannot be underestimated.” 

Around 49% of survey respondents say they don’t follow a defined procedure, and 78% say they do not have a system for monitoring contractual obligations. 

Knox says, “with the right transformation efforts focused around people, process and technology, contracting can actually become a business enabler and differentiator. The survey shows that one way in which organisations aim to tackle these challenges is through working with subject matter leaders and external providers.” 

Meanwhile, David B. Wilkins, Lester Kissel Professor of Law, Vice Dean for Global Initiatives on the Legal Profession, and Faculty Director of the Center on the Legal Profession, Harvard Law School, says, “Contracts are at the core of every business. They determine how growth happens and how risks are managed. It is therefore absolutely crucial that organisations have effective systems and processes to manage every aspect of the contracting process, from negotiation and execution to termination or renewal, as well as an accurate understanding of the obligations, benefits, and risks across the entire spectrum of their contracts.
For more procurement insights, check out Procurement magazine.

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Jun 10, 2021

Will Public Procurement Budgets Increase in 2021?

supplychain
Procurement
budgets
strategies
3 min
Often overlooked, government procurement professionals will play a critical role in helping communities, and local businesses recover from the pandemic

Procurement is more than just a private enterprise. COVID-19 reminded us that sourcing materials is an essential part of the government’s role. Throughout 2022, tiny departments sourced massive amounts of personal protective equipment (PPE), medical supplies, and emergency vaccines and testing kits. Even non-procurement professionals were pulled into the fray, as frantic timelines demanded nothing less. 

According to Celeste Frye, co-founder and CEO of Public Works Partners, the crisis brought procurement to the attention of skilled employees who had never considered it. As non-procurement personnel stepped up to help their coworkers, many found that they’d stumbled upon a critical and rewarding job. “Existing public employees have seen the essential nature of the work”, Frye said. “[They’ve] gained some critical skills and possibly [grown] interested in pursuing procurement as a longer-term career”. 

Small, Local Suppliers Take Charge

Frye, whose firm helps organisations engage stakeholders and develop long-term procurement strategies, thinks it well worth the effort to open one’s mind to new opportunities. Cooperative contracts, for instance, can help public departments and municipalities save money, time, and effort. By joining together with other towns or cities in the region, public procurement teams aggregate their purchasing power and can drive better deals. 

These cooperative contracts have the added benefit of advancing equity. Smaller suppliers that struggle to compete with established firms for government contracts can act as subcontractors, helping big suppliers fulfil bits of the project. Once they get their foot in the door, small, local, and disadvantaged suppliers can then leverage that government relationship to take on additional projects. 

Especially as governments start to pay attention to procurement resilience, public procurement departments must expand their requests for proposals (RFPs) to take into account innovative solutions and diverse suppliers. According to Frye, Public Works Partners—a certified female-owned firm—has benefitted from local and state requirements that specify diversity. 

Post-Pandemic Funding Swells Procurement Budgets 

And the pandemic won’t be the end of it. City governments need to build sustainable energy infrastructure such as solar panels, charging stations, and recycling plants, ensure that masks and medicines are never in short supply, and source new technologies to keep up with cloud and cybersecurity concerns. 

Public procurement budgets will likely increase to match demand. As Peter Ware, Partner and Head of Government at Browne Jacobson, explained, “in a non-pandemic world, the [U.K.] government spends on average around £290 billion on outsourced services, goods, and works...anywhere between 10% and 14% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Post-pandemic, city procurement will only increase as national governments provide local divisions with emergency funding.
And in truth, government employees might jump at the opportunity. Frye noted that public procurement could give immediate feedback on new programmes: “[Procurement] is where new laws and policies ‘hit the road’ and are implemented”, she said. “Professionals in these fields get the satisfaction of creating real change and seeing quantifiable outcomes of their work”.

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