May 17, 2020

Global logistics institute CILT to rebrand

CILT
Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport
strong
Freddie Pierce
2 min
Shutterstock
Follow @JosephWilkesWDM The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport(CILT) has announced it is to undergo a rebranding, and will be delivering a...

The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) has announced it is to undergo a rebranding, and will be delivering a new message of ‘Stronger Together’ along with a new logo.

The Institute's new message 'Stronger Together' along with the new purple and gold global logo was launched in Dublin on September 16. The UK launch will be at the annual awards event on October 24 (see our events and tradeshows pages for information about this industry event).

CILT has offices in 31 countries and a presence in more than 100 worldwide. It provides an extensive education, training and professional networking platform for professionals across the globe.

The Institute’s new single brand and message are designed to introduce a global identity of trusted professionalism which will be visible wherever its members are on the planet.

The new CILT purple and gold global logo is hoped set to become a familiar sight everywhere in the world and the institute says the new brand will provide all members with the following benefits:
• Global recognition through a single brand image
• Globally accepted professional standards
• a first choice home for all supply chain, logistics and transport professionals wherever they are 

Commenting on the announcement, CILT President Dr Dorothy Chan, of Hong Kong University, said:“The launch of the new common brand across all nations shows to our members that we believe we are stronger together as one professional family and that we can draw on one another to add greater value to the organisations we represent.

“I am particularly excited that this new brand will enable us to deliver on our key growth strategies internationally and allow all of our members and wider stakeholders to take part in our strong future together.

“The Institute has for many years championed professionalism in each discipline that we represent and our chartered members and fellows have recognised that a stronger unified image will allow us to communicate our core values more easily across the globe. We are particularly proud that our values of integrity and professionalism have been recognised by governments, educationalists and industry alike.”

Keith Newton, the Institute’s international Secretary General, added: “Having spent my whole career working closely with the Institute I am certain that our new common identity, with its confident message ‘Stronger Together’, will unify and energise our activities and enable us to be the first choice professional body for everybody associated with the supply chain, logistics and transport across the world.”

(a video has been made of Dr Chan talking about the rebrand, click here to  view it)

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Jun 15, 2021

FedEx is Reshaping Last Mile with Autonomous Vehicles

FedEx
Logistics
LastMile
AutonomousVehicles
3 min
FedEx is expanding a trial of autonomous vehicles in its last-mile logistics process with partner Nuro, including multi-stop and appointment deliveries

FedEx is embarking on an expanded test of autonomous, driver-less delivery vehicles to develop its last-mile logistics. 

The US logistics firm piloted autonomous vehicles from Nuro in April this year, and the pair will now explore that further in a multi-year partnership. Cosimo Leipold, Nuro’s head of partnerships, said the collaboration "will enable innovative, industry-first product offerings that will better everyday life and help make communities safer and greener". 

FedEx will explore a variety of on-road use cases for the autonomous fleet, including multi-stop and appointment-based deliveries, going beyond more traditional applications of the technology in single-route movement of goods from A-B. Exponential growth in ecommerce is spurring its broader experimentation in new autonomy solutions, Fed-Ex says, both in-warehouse and on-road. 

“FedEx was built on innovation, and it continues to be an integral part of our culture and business strategy,” said Rebecca Yeung, Vice President, Advanced Technology and Innovation, FedEx Corporation. “We are excited to collaborate with an industry leader like Nuro as we continue to explore the use of autonomous technologies within our operations.”

 

The changing role of couriers 

Unlike structured delivery networks, operating under long-term partnerships and contracts, agility is where couriers deliver true value - and their ability to deftly solve last-mile fulfilment has most acutely been felt during the pandemic. For the billions of people around the world forced to stay at home to protect themselves and their communities from the spreading COVID-19 virus, couriers have been a constant. They may have been the only knock at the door some people experienced for weeks or months at a time. 

But the last-mile has been uprooted by a boom in ecommerce, a shift that has been most apparent in the UK, US, China and Japan, according to the Global Parcel Delivery Market Insight Report 2021 by Apex Insight. These are markets with dominant economies and populations used to running their lives with a tap of a screen or double-click of a mouse. 

“Getting last mile delivery right has long been a challenge for retailers,” says Kees Jacobs, Vice President, Consumer Goods and Retail at Capgemini. “In 2019, 97% of retail organisations felt their last-mile delivery models were not sustainable for full-scale implementation across all locations. Despite increasing demand from customers, companies were struggling to make the last mile profitable and efficient.”

Jacobs says that the pandemic alleviated some of these stresses in the short term. With no other option, consumers were understanding and tolerant, if not entirely happy, with longer delivery times and less transparent tracking. “But, as extremely high delivery demand continues to be normal, customers will expect brands to contract their delivery times,” he adds. 

Last mile's role in ESG

Demand and volume weren’t the only things that have changed during the pandemic - businesses looked closer to home and as a result became more sustainable. Bricks and mortar stores were transformed from mini-showrooms to quasi-fulfilment centres. Online retailers and other businesses sought local solutions to ship more faster. In densely populated London, UK alone, Accenture found that delivery van emissions dropped by 17%, while Chicago, USA and Sydney, Australia saw similar emissions savings. 
 

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