May 17, 2020

FAA's recuperation measures ignore air freight pilots

Supply Chain Digital
Federal Aviation Administration
FAA
Freddie Pierce
2 min
Federal Aviation Administration mandates set rest-time for commercial pilots; air cargo pilots outraged by decision to place cargo operations on voluntary basis
Commercial pilots in the United States received an early Christmas present this week when the Federal Aviation Administration mandated commercial pilot...

Commercial pilots in the United States received an early Christmas present this week when the Federal Aviation Administration mandated commercial pilot regulations aimed at adding rest and reducing workload.

The FAA ruled that pilots for commercial planes must rest for at least 10 hours before they even report for flying duty. Among other initiatives, the FAA ruled that single-crew flight operations can only work a maximum of 14-hour flight duties, while an eight-to-nine hour flight-time restriction has been set.

Pilots of commercial planes must also report at the beginning of each shift if they are fit for duty.

“We made a promise to the traveling public that we would do everything possible to make sure pilots are rested when they get in the cockpit,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in a statement. “This new rule raises the safety bar to prevent fatigue.”

While the FAA’s mandates are good news for pilots, the struggling airline industry as a whole is expected to lose money from the tighter regulations. According to the FAA’s press release, these measures would cost the business a shade under $300 million.

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Furthermore, cargo pilots did not receive the reduced workload benefits of their commercial counterparts. The FAA’s ruling is seen as voluntary throughout the air freight world, which has ruffled some feathers.

“Giving air cargo carriers the choice to opt into new pilot rest rules makes as much sense as allowing truckers to ‘opt-out’ of drunk driving laws,” Independent Pilots Association president Robert Travis said in a statement. “To potentially allow fatigued cargo pilots to share the same skies with properly rested passenger pilots creates an unnecessary threat to public safety. We can do better.”

The Independent Pilots Association is the trade union that represents UPS. The FAA maintains that the decision to not extend the rest regulations to air cargo pilots was strictly monetary.

“Covering cargo operations under the new rule would be too costly compared to the benefits generated in this portion of the industry,” the FAA said in a statement, adding that cargo carriers should simply “opt into the new rule voluntarily.”

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Jun 24, 2021

Kuehne+Nagel cuts carbon footprint by 70% for Honda China

Kuehne+Nagel
CarbonNeutral
supplychain
Logistics
2 min
Road-to-rail logistics solution will reduce carbon emissions at the automaker by 70%, stripping 16,000 tonnes of CO2 from its supply chain

Around 16,000 tonnes of CO2 has been cut from supply chain of Honda's China-based manufacturing division through a road-to-rail transformation in partnership with logistics leader Kuehne+Nagel

The programme was developed through KN Sincero, the joint venture between Swiss headquartered Kuehne+Nagel and Chinese automotive logistics firm Sincero, established in 2018. 

KN Sincero worked with Honda China to develop an integrated solution to convert much of its domestic long-haul trucking to train lines, using regional hubs to improve supply chain performance and further reduce carbon emissions. The programme delivered consolidations as well as value-added services, including sorting, scanning, repackaging, GPS track and trace, and recyclable container management. 

"Kuehne+Nagel has always been a supply chain partner that we can rely on, to help us improve our supply chain performance whilst also achieving our environmental goals,” said Mr. Jiang Hui and Mr. Takuji Kitamura, Joint General Manager of Wuhan Dong Hon, the logistics affiliate of Dongfong Honda Automotive. 

After six months of shifting to the road-to-rail model, new supply chain reliability and efficiencies are expected too trip 16,000 tonnes of carbon emissions annually. The carbon savings represent an enormous 70% reduction in total. 

"Automotive is one of the most important sectors in contract logistics, particularly in China, the world’s largest automotive market,” added Gianfranco Sgro, member of the Management Board of Kuehne + Nagel International AG, responsible for Contract Logistics. “I am glad that Kuehne+Nagel and Honda share a common vision of service, innovation and sustainability.”

Kuehne+Nagel’s Net Zero Carbon programme 
 

Kuehne+Nagel announced its Net Zero Carbon programme in 2019 with a dual purpose to reduce CO2 output in its own logistics operations, as well as partnering with organisations to minimise their own impact on the planet. Kuehne+Nagel reached carbon neutrality globally in 2020 throughout its own, direct emissions, and is now focused on developing its capabilities to serve partners. 

Dr. Detlef Trefzger, Chief Executive Officer of Kuehne+Nagel International AG, said the programme is “a package of measures to fight CO2 emissions and provide sustainable and innovative supply chain solutions – hand in hand with our suppliers and customers”. 

As part of the initiative, Kuehne+Nagel established its own nature projects in Myanmar and New Zealand, and invested in ‘nature-based’ carbon dioxide compensation projects to strip harmful emissions from the environment. It is committed to being CO2 neutral for shipments in its network of transport suppliers by 2030. 
 

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