Aug 27, 2020

Arm: A Competitive Edge in Logistics through eSIM

Supply Chain
Manufacturing
Logistics
Arm
Sean Galea-Pace
3 min
Supply Chain Digital explores Arm’s whitepaper to find out how eSIM can equip manufacturers with a competitive advantage.
Supply Chain Digital explores Arm’s whitepaper to find out how eSIM can equip manufacturers with a competitive advantage...

There are a number of challenges for companies responsible for merchandising and transportation to overcome. The way shipping and logistics firms operate has evolved and smart tracking solutions - whether its smart logistics devices or tracking add-ons implemented by manufacturers - are now playing an influential role in the digitalisation of logistics.

Traditional supply chains struggle to deal with disruption. The labour and goods shortages and increase in direct to consumer fulfillment experienced today applies pressure that can ultimately break a chain. A small increase in visibility can protect a critical supply. Increased visibility leads to automation, which then results in cost savings for everyone in the supply chain. Complete visibility manufactured from the beginning that follows items from factory to customer, creates resilient supply chains of the future that can withstand any disruption.

The eSIM technology will help to solve some of these challenges. As a result of eSIM, manufacturers can take advantage of IoT connectivity that is seamless, as it is embedded at the point of manufacture and can be deployed automatically out-of-the-box in any geographical region. eSIM technology provides a comprehensive range of benefits to manufacturers of connected devices for logistics and transportation. With the industry facing unprecedented challenges as a result of COVID-19, it is time for manufacturers to double down and lead the sector to ever greater visibility and automation.

Check out Arm’s whitepaper to find out more about: 

  • The four steps towards embedded connectivity.
  • How eSIM simplifies selling internationally.
  • How embedded connectivity supports supply chain management and optimises last mile logistics.
  • How Arm partner Sensize became logistics pioneers.

Four Steps to Embedded Connectivity

Arm anticipates that 1 trillion new IoT devices will be produced by the year 2035, and an ever-increasing number of device manufacturers are helping this prediction become reality. From discussions with enterprises the world over Arm understands that complexity can be a barrier to larger IoT projects. Manufacturers can eliminate much of this complexity by providing devices with embedded connectivity that ‘just works’

  1. Take an eSIM.
  2. Add a bootstrap profile.
  3. Link a management platform.
  4. Choose a network.

International Selling Simplified

If you produce smart logistics devices, eSIM technology can empower you to make international selling more straight-forward. No one operator can provide truly global connectivity, meaning logistics manufacturers that want to provide their product globally must contract with more than one operator to secure operator-specific SIM cards. Without eSIM, manufacturers must create and maintain separate product lines for each mobile network operator to account for the different SIM cards required, despite the fact that the underlying device itself is the same.

Tracking your products made easier

Adding a trackable embedded connectivity chip to previously unconnected products allows manufacturers to harvest a constant stream of data before, during and after the product is shipped. This provides end-to-end real-time visibility of their supply chain, which means that not only can they constantly monitor the status of products and take immediate action to protect their integrity, but it also optimises their supply chain and processes.

Case Study

Sensize develops IoT-enabled nodes that are pioneering better visibility for reusable packaging in the supply chain. The concept involves adding the latest tracking technology to humble pallets, crates, and containers that are shipped in their millions by retailers, fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) and logistics companies.

These nodes feature thermal sensors to alert retailers to temperature excursions, accelerometers that record impact, and timers to log periods of refrigeration, all of which helps depict the current state and location of a consignment. The Cambridge-based start-up had already developed a proof of concept with two of the UK’s largest grocery retailers and was about to win a major contract with a global courier distributing to the UK, Italy, Austria, Germany, China, and Russia.

Interested in reading more? Check out Arm’s full whitepaper here! 

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Jun 8, 2021

DHL Claim Multi-Sector Collaboration Key to Fighting COVID

DHL
Supplychain
COVID19
Logistics
3 min
Global logistics leader DHL’s new white paper highlights what supply chain professionals have learned one year into the pandemic

Since January, global logistics leader DHL has distributed more than 200 million doses of the COVID vaccine to 120+ countries around the globe. While the US and UK recently rolled out immunisation plans to most citizens, countries with less developed infrastructure still desperately need more doses. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which currently has one of the highest per-capita immunisation rates, the government set up storage facilities to cover domestic and international demand. But storage, as we’ve learned, is little help if you can’t transport the goods.

 

This is where logistics leaders such as DHL make their impact. The company built over 50 new partnerships, bilateral and multilateral, to collaborate with pharmaceutical and private sector firms. With more than 350 DHL centres pressed into service, the group operated 9,000+ flights to ship the vaccine where it needed to go. 


 

Public-Private Partnerships

With new pandemic knowledge, DHL just released its “Revisiting Pandemic Resilience” white paper, which examined the role of logistics and supply chain companies in handling COVID-19. As Thomas Ellman, Head of Clinical Trials Logistics at DHL, said: “The past one year has highlighted the importance of logistics and supply chain management to manage the pandemic, ensure business continuity and protect public health. It has also shown us that together we are stronger”. 

 

Multisector partnerships, DHL said, enabled rapid, effective vaccine distribution. While international scientists developed a vaccine in record time—five times faster than any other vaccine in history—manufacturers ramped up production and logistics teams rolled out distribution three times faster than expected. When commercial routes faced backups, logistics operators worked with military officers to transport vaccines via helicopters and boats. 

 

In the UAE, the public-private HOPE Consortium distributed billions of COVID-19 doses to its civilians as well as other countries in need by partnering with commercial organisations such as DHL. For the first time, apropo for an unprecedented pandemic, logistics companies made strong connections with public health and government.

 

“While the race against the virus continues, leveraging the power of such collaborations and data analytics will be key”, said Katja Busch, Chief Commercial Officer DHL and Head of DHL Customer Solutions & Innovation. “We need to remain prepared for high patient and vaccine volumes, maintain logistics infrastructure and capacity, while planning for seasonal fluctuations by providing a stable and well-equipped platform for the years to come”. 


 

How Do We Sustain Immunisation? 

By the end of 2021, experts estimate that we need approximately 10 billion doses of vaccines—many of which will be shipped to areas of the world, such as India, South Africa, and Brazil, that lack significant infrastructure. This is perhaps the greatest divide between countries that have rolled out successful immunisation programmes and those that have not. As Busch noted, “the UAE’s significant investments in creating robust air, sea, and land infrastructure facilitated logistics and vaccine distribution, helping us keep supply chains resilient”. 

 

Neither is the novel coronavirus a one-time affair. If predictions hold, COVID will be similar to seasonal colds or the flu: here to stay. When fall comes around each year, governments will need to vaccinate the world as quickly as possible to ensure long-term immunisation against the virus. This time, logistics companies must be better prepared. 


Yet global immunisation, year after year, is no small order. To keep reinfection rates low and slow the spread of COVID, governments will likely need 7-9 billion annual doses of the vaccine to meet that mark. And if DHL’s white paper is any judge of success, multi-sector supply chain partnerships will set the gold standard.

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