[Report] Majority of Fortune 100 companies monitor supply chains for human rights abuses

By Admin
Some 95 percent of Fortune 100 companies have pledged to drive out human rights abuses within their global supply chains by introducing policies to coun...

Some 95 percent of Fortune 100 companies have pledged to drive out human rights abuses within their global supply chains by introducing policies to counter forced labour and human trafficking.

A report by the American Bar Association (ABA) looked into evidence on company websites that efforts are being made to tackle the two atrocities as well as the trade in conflict materials.

Around two thirds have policies in relation to forced labour, the report entitled How do Fortune 100 corporations address potential links to human rights violations in a globally integrated economy? finds.

Just over half (54 percent) have policies targeting human trafficking and 68 percent have a commitment to supply chain monitoring, with most using a mixture of internal and external monitoring methods.

More than 60 percent also express a commitment to providing training for staff and supply chain vendors.

The revelations have been met with praise by human rights groups, including Cindy McCain of Arizona Governor’s Task Force on Human Trafficking, who called it a milestone and said that the business community had joined the fight to end the abuse.

The report was produced with the McCain Institute for International Leadership and the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. 

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