IKEA’s “Buy Back” Scheme For Sustainability

By Oliver Freeman
IKEA has announced an initiative that sees the furniture giant “buy back” used furniture, in exchange for vouchers, for the sake of recycling...

IKEA, the Swedish multinational group that sells ready-to-assemble furniture, kitchen appliances and home accessories, has just stepped up their contribution to fighting the ever-growing environmental problems that the world faces. Increased carbon emissions are threatening the survival of our planet and, unfortunately, manufacturing norms of the last century be a major reason for that issue. In an attempt to lessen their company’s carbon footprint, IKEA bosses have announced that they will now do a “Buy Back” scheme, to ensure that their used furniture doesn’t end up in the landfill pile. 

How Does The Scheme Work?

At IKEA “we believe that our products deserve a second life, as such, we are willing to buy your used IKEA products from you.” 

The “Buy-back and re-sell in store” service will allow IKEA to help out their customers in a time when a lot of people are a little strapped for cash. They’ll buy back their used furniture and hand customers a personal IKEA refund card which they’ll top up with a percentage of the original price, dependent on the condition of the product. 

Every returned product will then be placed in the “AS-IS” sale section of the shop, with more affordable pricing for consumers looking for a bargain. Or, if it’s in deplorable condition, the company will recycle it. “It’s this kind of approach and way of thinking that will help us achieve our goals of becoming a circular business and people and planet positive,” IKEA stated. 

Going Circular

The circular supply chain concept is one that many companies are looking to instil. It’s a model that encourages manufacturers and product and service sellers to reclaim discarded products and materials so that they can either re-sell or recycle them. It’s an excellent way to reduce a companies carbon footprint, rather than consistently producing one-time-use products that eventually end up at the local tip or in a landfill site.

“Our intention is to on-sell your products to a new home, and we want to ensure that 'buy-back' products purchased by customers are of a high quality and meet our obligations under the Competition and Consumer Act 2010.”

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